H-RISE 公益財団法人北海道科学技術総合振興センター 幌延地圏環境研究所

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H-RISE 公益財団法人北海道科学技術総合振興センター 幌延地圏環境研究所

What is H-RISE?
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Northern Advancement Center for Science & Technology
H-RISE
5-3 Sakaemachi, Horonobe-cho, Teshio-gun, Hokkaido, 098-3221, Japan.
TEL+81-1632-9-4112
FAX +81-1632-9-4113

What is H-RISE?

 Horonobe RISE (Research Institute for the Subsurface Environment; H-RISE) was established in June 2003 with the idea of utilizing the Underground Research Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and its facilities to conduct research related to improving the global environment. H-RISE has since been carrying out fundamental research related to the subsurface environment of both the Horonobe and Tempoku regions, as well as the practical use of three specific components of this environment for engineering purposes: the subsurface microbial environment, groundwater environment, and sedimentary rock characteristics.
 With an eye towards procuring long-term results, based on the H-RISE Research Plan created by Horonobe Town in February 2003, H-RISE implemented basic scientific research with such themes as “Research on the Characteristics and Geological Effects of Sedimentary Rock,” “Research on the Subsurface Microbial Environment and Its Effective Utilization,” and “Research on the Underground Migration of Groundwater and Gas and the Broader Subsurface Environment” while also initiating projects designed to utilize basic research to stimulate the local economy by improving local industry and living environments during the nine-year period from 2003 to 2012. In 2012, the Northern Advancement Center for Science & Technology began to advance research based on a new long-term research plan created in February of that year. In addition to developing basic research, H-RISE has also conducted research on the important topics of “Developing Methods for Transforming Underused Organic Matter in Geological Formations into Biomethane through Microbial Activity” and “Developing Methods for Accumulating Carbon Dioxide in Geological Formations and Transforming it into Organic Matter through Microbial Activity.”